Mistaken Love: A True Story by P. Mohan Chandran SignUp
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Memoirs Share This Page
Mistaken Love: A True Story
by P. Mohan Chandran Bookmark and Share
 


This is a story, but a real one.

There was a bloke by name Sachin. He was an Anglophile (who had unfathomable love for English and things associated with English). He was a very studious, hardworking, an altruistic and 'no-nonsense' guy. He had excellent communication skills and endeared himself to all by his pleasing manners and etiquette. He never used to shirk from his responsibilities and even willingly accepted additional ones. He used to help all invariably at the drop of a hat. But, he was very bashful in nature, especially towards the fairer sex. He seldom used to accost women and gals, and always gave them a wide berth (by maintaining safe distance from them). Sometimes, whenever he encountered them accidentally, he was overcome by an 'inferiority complex.'

Things, however, began to change gradually for the better. He realized his flaw and tried his part to be as sociable as possible with the opposite sex. He understood that women were no different from men and vibed with men without any social inhibitions.

One fine day, he came across a beautiful damsel, who bewitched him abysmally. He was deeply struck by her beauty, simplicity and wit. Hardly ever had he seen a damsel with a blend of beauty and intelligence; for, there goes an adage that 'beauty and nonsense are closely related.'

He accosted her at an opportune moment and developed good friendship with her. He learned that her name was Deepa and she was very cordial, helpful and obedient by nature. She too was an Anglophile and had great love for English. Congenial interests brought them together and their friendship flourished and blossomed.

But, Sachin mistook Deepa's cordial friendship for 'love.' He felt (or was rather made to feel by his own misjudgment) that Deepa's every gesture and expression was a reciprocation and acknowledgement of her love for him. But alas, how grossly mistaken he was!

One day, he gathered all his spunk and went up to Deepa to express his profound love for her. But, it was not as if he was totally optimistic that Deepa would accept his love. He had his own apprehensions (as does everyone in love) and prepared himself with a commixture of optimism and pessimism. He confessed his unfathomable love for her and sought hers. But, she spurned his love and thus broke an innocent heart.

Sachin became deeply depressed. Scarcely had he come into contact with any girl or woman. When he was showered with bounteous love and affection (misconstrued by Sachin, of course) by Deepa, he got carried away. He had never received so much warmth and cordiality from any woman. So, this led him to misconstrue her friendship and feelings for him as 'love.'

However, when he reasoned in the solitude of his drawing room, he understood the hard reality that love is a feeling, which comes from the heart, naturally, intrinsically, and spontaneously, and it cannot be forced, coaxed or thrust upon someone. Gradually, he resigned to fate and came to terms with the reality.

Today ' after 8 long traumatic years ' he still longs for Deepa's love, who, he hopes, will understand his unselfish and unrequited love, and return to him one day so that he can cherish her forever in the 'heart of his hearts.'

Notes 
Names have been changed to sustain privacy and protect the true identity of individuals.    

14-May-2006
More by :  P. Mohan Chandran
 
Views: 1889
 
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