Dr. Binayak Sen by Dr. Amitabh Mitra SignUp
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Dr. Binayak Sen
by Dr. Amitabh Mitra Bookmark and Share
 

The saga of Dr. Binayak Sen continues. Now imprisoned for life on unconfirmed charges, Binayak joins the rank of many political prisoners who remain incarcerated behind bars without any proven record of unlawful activities. What amazes me more is the massive following that Binayak has now and that includes Nobel Laureates, educationists and politicians of all hues from across the globe. A few days back, I heard about the total shutdown of all businesses and government institutions in the province of Chhattisgarh for a single day in support of the good doctor.

Then who is Binayak Sen and why should the far right Bhartiya Janta Party led government in Chhattisgarh be acutely involved in hounding him? The process of unfurling fraudulent allegations against him did not just start a few years back. His close association with the tribals and dispensing of free medication to them dealt a severe blow on the corporate- government strategies. Binayak got bolder and started a mini hospital and chain of clinics in deep tribal interiors which he and his wife Ilina ran them successfully.

Many would ask me that why should be so inclined in writing about Dr. Binayak Sen.  Why shouldn’t I? When Dr. Papiya Ghosh was murdered brutally at her Patna house, the Indian intelligentsia kept quiet. My colleagues in the medical fraternity sided with the powers controlling the investigation and gave conflicting opinions. It was only after her sister, Tuktuk Ghosh, an Indian Administrative Officer attached to the former speaker of the Parliament, Communist leader Somnath Chatterjee approached the Prime Minister, Mr. Manmohan Singh that the inquiry of her murder case was seriously taken. 

I was posted at Kondagaon in Bustar as an Assistant Surgeon by the Madhya Pradesh Government sometimes during 1983. I did go there but came back and joined a bee line to Bharat Bhavan , Bhopal for a transfer to Gwalior.  The living conditions in the tribal belt during those years were beyond any human understanding and it remains as such after the formation of the new province of Chhattisgarh.

The British Medical Journal and the Lancet has highlighted the unjust conviction of Dr. Binayak Sen but then the Indian Medical Association and its various subgroups never gave a single statement of condemnation, neither the various Padama shri nor Padma vibhushan awarded doctors decided to look beyond medicine and crass commercialisation of their daily practice. I remember the time when the complete health system of the Madhya Pradesh Government was paralysed because of a lightning strike for a pay hike by doctors yet the same doctors would not now think of even raising a single thought favouring Binayak Sen.

Today I live in a city where the statue of Steve Biko stands opposite the grand architectural buildings from the colonial era and now housing the Mayor’s office. Steve Biko was admitted at the University of Natal Medical School. He was expelled later for his political inclination

From Wikipedia 

On the 18th of August, 1977, Biko was arrested at a police roadblock under the Terrorism Act No 83 of 1967 and interrogated by officers of the Port Elizabeth security police including Harold Snyman and Gideon Nieuwoudt. This interrogation took place in the Police Room 619 (sometimes numbered as 6-1-9). The interrogation lasted twenty-two hours and included torture and beatings resulting in a coma. He suffered a major head injury while in police custody, and was chained to a window grille for a day.

On 11 September 1977, police loaded him in the back of a Land Rover, naked and restrained in manacles, and began the 1500 km drive to Pretoria to take him to a prison with hospital facilities. However, he was nearly dead owing to the previous injuries.  He died shortly after arrival at the Pretoria prison, on 12 September. The police claimed his death was the result of an extended hunger strike, but an autopsy revealed multiple bruises and abrasions and that he ultimately succumbed to a brain hemorrhage from the massive injuries to the head,  which many saw as strong evidence that he had been brutally clubbed by his captors.

In the same way as the Indian Medical Association, the South African Medical Association kept quiet and later apologized after democracy opened its windows in South Africa. Aren’t we a democratic nation? The murder of the intellectual Azad in a false encounter by the police, the removal of Dr. Binayak Sen from the free tenets of a society, the ever-growing scams where politicians from the ruling and opposition never lose their hunger for money and power and ordinary citizens with free political thoughts are brutally subdued, such remains the tatters of a democracy that is India today.

I remember the famous heart surgeon, Dr. Chris Barnard who hugged me once at Colombo many years back, He said, Amitabh, Democracy remains a delusion, true democracy can never be achieved. South Africa had just won a democracy then. I didn’t believe him then.

Some of my poems on Dr. Binayak Sen –
Binayak Sen – A Poem in Hindi by Amitabh Mitra
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6C1sea-ZkBs

Chhattisgarh – The poem is being recited outside the Indian Consulate in Washington
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ikd98qMw-yQ
   

25-Jan-2011
More by :  Dr. Amitabh Mitra
 
Views: 1815
Article Comment Unfortunately, Shekhar Sahab, its the vocal majority that speaks now. I still dont understand the reason for your unhappiness towards Jesuit organisations. Please visit the deep interiors of Chhattisgarh to understand the reason of the revolt. Dr. Binayak Sen would be released soon. You talked about Left Activists who have been vocal. Ever heard Sitaram Yechury utter a single word.
amitabhmitra
02/04/2011
Article Comment Publish this if you have the guts!

Left sees red over verdict against Sen

Author: Shashi Shekhar
Publication: The Pioneer
Date: January 3, 2011
URL: http://www.dailypioneer.com/307736/Left-sees-red-over-verdict-against-Sen.html

The Left's manufactured outrage over the conviction of Maoists sympathiser Binayak Sen is neither a reflection of public sentiment nor an enlightened quest for judicial reforms. This outrage is aimed at deflecting attention from that uncomfortable and embarrassing question on where exactly the line blurs between Leftist activism and Maoist terrorism

The life sentence given to Binayak Sen, a known activist for Leftist causes, by a District Sessions Court in Chhattisgarh has provoked a curious sense of outrage from certain sections in the media. Even more curious has been the reaction from leading members of Ms Sonia Gandhi-led National Advisory Council. The three-year saga over the legal case against Binayak Sen stands out for the intense scrutiny it has received from national and international activists of the Leftist persuasion. No judge presiding over any criminal case in post-Independence India perhaps has been pressured to this degree.

The certitude with which Leftist activists and the media had pronounced a verdict in this trial well before the judge got down to the issue, one in the court speaks of the extraordinary stress the process and institutions of justice were put to in this case.

There has been a litany of signature campaigns, inspired media events and even Internet sites dedicated to the single cause of getting Binayak Sen released even before the courts are done with him. To further this cause in support of Binayak Sen, a narrative has been floated in the media highlighting the humanitarian work done by Binayak Sen while at the same time throwing little light on the kind of politics he has been associated with all his life.

An example of this carefully crafted narrative in the media is a piece in Tehelka magazine titled, "The doctor, the state and a sinister case" published on February 23, 2008. It is remarkable that in this piece, Binayak Sen's association with the PUCL is underplayed with just one reference buried deep inside the piece. A more significant omission in that piece is the fact that Binayak Sen had issued a Press release in December 2005 on Narayan Sanyal's disappearance - a week before the actual arrest of Narayan Sanyal took place in January 2006.

It would be a grave mistake to assume that the media campaign in support of Binayak Sen is a reflection of universal public outrage over his conviction. The merits of Binayak Sen's conviction notwithstanding, it must be said that the people of India, by and large, have faith in the judiciary. They believe that justice will ultimately be done, as it was in the case of the December 13, 2001 attack on Parliament House, even if it sometimes is delayed by decades on account of systemic backlogs.

It would also be a grave mistake to assume that this is somehow about dealing with the myriad systemic problems that justice delivery in India suffers from on account of archaic processes and outdated laws. If this were really about judicial reforms, we would not just be seeing episodic outrage over Binayak Sen's life sentence. Had it actually been about judicial reforms, we would have seen sustained national campaigns of the variety the Left has been running on issues like RTI, Right to Food and Right to Work.

This episodic outrage is far from being about judicial reforms. These very same Leftist-activists are complicit in judicial activism that goes far beyond the constitutional division of powers between the judiciary, the executive and the legislature. An example of such activism is the continuance of Mr Harsh Mander and Mr NC Saxena as Special Commissioners of the Supreme Court to monitor implementation of court orders on food security even as they play a political role as advisers to the UPA Government through Ms Gandhi-led NAC.

The manufactured outrage we are witnessing in the op-ed columns of the English language media and in the 24x7 TV studios is neither a reflection of public sentiment nor an enlightened quest for judicial reforms. The concerted media campaign in support of Binayak Sen needs to be seen in a different light.

There is a small but committed network of individuals and groups that goes by the label of 'civil society' that has worked actively to monopolise opinion-making and by extension policy-making in New Delhi. This vocal minority has over the years come to coordinate its efforts at various levels with a commitment towards a shared goal. That shared goal, described in their own word,s is "interlinking for effective action of various groups that are opposed to neo-liberalism and domination of the world by capital". This vocal minority coordinated its efforts under the banner of the World Social Forum during its fourth convention in Mumbai held in January 2004.

All the three leading lights of Ms Gandhi-led NAC - Mr Harsh Mander, Ms Aruna Roy and Mr Jean Dreze, who have been most vocal on the Binayak Sen verdict, have been closely associated with these 'interlinking' efforts. It is an established fact that the three flagship items on the UPA's social agenda - RTI, NREGA and food security - were the result of coordinated national campaigns by the various Leftist groups that came together during the WSF's 2004 Mumbai convention.

It must be noted that Binayak Sen and his wife Ilina were an integral part of this committed network of groups and their associated national campaigns. Binayak Sen and Ilina Sen are acknowledged as key contributors along with other NAC members in a handbook on NREGA brought out by the Right to Food Campaign network of groups. The ridiculous and extraneous reference to ISI during the Binayak Sen trial notwithstanding, it must be noted that the Jesuit-managed Indian Social Institute was also an active participant in the 'interlinking' efforts at WSF. It must also be noted that the ISI's sister Jesuit organisation, JESA, was behind a number of activist interventions under the banner of the Indian People's Tribunal. These IPT-organised people's courts have seen active participation from members of Ms Gandhi-led NAC on a number of occasions.

The outrage from this vocal minority that comprises NAC members and Leftist-Jesuit activists is understandable for one of its key members has now been caught in that grey zone where activism blurred into sympathies for Maoist terrorism. A fact under-reported by the Indian media is that the Maoist official mouthpiece, the Maoist Information Bulletin, had sympathetic references to Binayak Sen in almost every issue over the last 24 months. This outrage is aimed at deflecting attention from that uncomfortable and embarrassing question on where exactly the line blurs between Leftist activism and Maoist terrorism.

It would be a shame if the executive and the judiciary were to buckle under pressure from this vocal minority to overturn the lower court's verdict. Binayak Sen's fate must be decided in the higher courts on the merits of the case against him. To borrow a commentator's quote - we must not allow the "grammar of blackmail" from a vocal minority to replace the "grammar of justice". This vocal minority does not speak for the silent majority.
seadog4227
02/04/2011
Article Comment Many thanks, Upalbhai
amitabhmitra
01/26/2011
Article Comment Amitabh, your effort will be appreciated all around.Binayak's embattled sensibility should egg many of us on.He deserves every bit of what you did. May your effort urge many more to disseminate the idea and values Dr Binayak Sen stood for.
Upal Deb
01/26/2011
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