Installing Red Hat Linux 6.1 - 3 by Ashwin Acharya SignUp
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Installing Red Hat Linux 6.1 - 3
by Ashwin Acharya Bookmark and Share
 

Now that the difficult part is over, we can cool off a little. The remaining part just consists of configuring Linux. Its pretty simple if you know how.

In Linux, Your computer will have to be called something. Name it anything you want to. Weirder names preferable. Then you have to choose your mouse type. I hope you have all the information about your computer at your fingertips (or on a piece of paper before you). Choose a generic 2/3-button mouse (either serial or PS2 depending on your make). The COM port to which your mouse has been attached has to be chosen. Remember, com1 is /dev/ttyS0, com2 is /dev/ttyS1 and so on. Next choose the time zone you live in.

As you hopefully know, Linux is a multi user system. It has a user called "root". This user is as close to God as you can get. (On a Linux system of course). He has the right and the power to do whatever he wants to on this system. You will find that every other user has some or the other security restrictions. But the root can use anything and delete anything. The next step will be to enter a password for the root user. Do NOT forget this password. You will then have to format the entire partition and install Linux all over again.

The next step will be to add normal user accounts. As this can be done later we will ignore this part and go on to the next part. Choose shadow and MD5 but not NIS.

The next step will be to choose packages for Linux. If you have chosen any of the two workstations then this step will not be present. Choose only the default packages. Next time when you are more experienced, you can choose the individual packages. After selecting the packages, insert the floppy and create a boot disk.

Setup your monitor as follows:
If not present in the list, choose custom. Then you can select the horizontal and vertical frequencies. Then set the resolution of X-Windows. Let the default settings remain. Use X-probe only if you have to.

The installation is now complete. You have finished installing Linux. You are now a Linux guru (not quite you still have a long way to go).  

25-Jan-2001
More by :  Ashwin Acharya
 
Views: 1323
 
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