Chhing Lamu Sherpa Spirit of the Mountains by Subhash Arora SignUp
Boloji.com
Boloji
Home Kabir Poetry Blogs BoloKids Writers Contribute Search Contact Site Map Advertise RSS Login Register
Boloji
Channels

In Focus

Analysis
Cartoons
Education
Environment
Going Inner
Opinion
Photo Essays

Columns

A Bystander's Diary
Business
My Word
PlainSpeak
Random Thoughts

Our Heritage

Architecture
Astrology
Ayurveda
Buddhism
Cinema
Culture
Dances
Festivals
Hinduism
History
People
Places
Sikhism
Spirituality
Vastu
Vithika

Society & Lifestyle

Family Matters
Health
Parenting
Perspective
Recipes
Society
Teens
Women

Creative Writings

Book Reviews
Ghalib's Corner
Humor
Individuality
Literary Shelf
Love Letters
Memoirs
Musings
Quotes
Ramblings
Stories
Travelogues
Workshop

Computing

CC++
Computing Articles
Flash
Internet Security
Java
Linux
Networking
Society Share This Page
Chhing Lamu Sherpa Spirit of the Mountains
by Subhash Arora Bookmark and Share
 

When Chhing Lamu Sherpa (born 1960) went to school for the first time, she had to face ridicule - she was 17 years old! Her sister's paralysis had prevented her from going to school for a long time. Later, Chhing even fought her relatives and the community when they tried to engage her to her sister's fianc�. She eventually managed to convince them that she should be allowed to lead her own life. Putting in a lot of hard work, she was able to obtain her school-leaving  certificate at 23.

The determination that took Chhing to her first village school in Phinjoling village in Udaipur district of eastern Nepal also helped her make a success of her life. Not only was this farmer's daughter the first girl in her village to complete high school; she also went to college, earning a graduate diploma from UK's Reading University.

Chhing is a role model for her village's schoolchildren, not only for her relative erudition but also for supporting her brothers and sisters through their education. Most of all, she is lauded for the work she does with mountain rural communities like her own.

For two decades now, Chhing has worked at the village and district levels in remote areas of north-eastern Nepal, including trans-boundary work in Tibet and India (Yuksam village in west Sikkim), helping groom young people for leadership roles and training them in conflict mitigation, strengthening institutions, environment management, and gender and ethnic sensitivity.

Chhing started out in 1982 as a junior instructor in a government-run women's training centre, training women workers and advising housewives on managing their kitchen gardens.

Five years later, she joined ActionAid (an INGO) as senior community organizer and gender development coordinator. As part of her job, Chhing lived in the homes of members of various communities. She drew attention to the disparities between the so-called lower- and upper-castes, and initiated group action to correct these disparities.

Chhing left ActionAid to join the Makalu-Barun National Park and Conservation Project, wanting to learn about environment and conservation issues. She rallied local women around the conservation and development of the area. Today, local groups play a vital role in conservation, along with the marketing of Allo, a traditional type of cloth, in Kathmandu.

While working in the park, Chhing would sometimes get lost in the forests, with lots of lichens and no food for company. She remembers going on 20-day field trips with her colleagues, punctuated with little or no breathers. She intervened in community disputes, once managing to persuade two groups, Christian and Buddhist, to bury their hatchets and built a toilet together.

In 1994, the young men of the area, especially Sherpas - an ethnic minority often subsisting as expedition guides - motivated her to form Mountain Spirit, an organization that works with the youth. She helped mobilize about 2,000 community members and 75 youths to work as trainers. Seven years later, Chhing transferred Mountain Spirit's leadership to the youth she had enlisted.

Since 2004, she has been employed by Plan Nepal, an NGO working on child- entered community development, as a district programme manager. Initially criticized for travelling with male colleagues, she has today been honored by organizations like the Nepal Sherpa Association for her contribution to the social sector.

Chhing's forte is the use of participatory and appreciative enquiry approaches in programme design and implementation in situations of conflict mitigation. She has used her expertise through several networks, including forums for indigenous people and NGOs.

In 1996, the US Ambassador to Nepal, impressed by Chhing's work with Makalu-Barun, invited her to the US to speak to women's groups about her work. Chhing is also a member of many social and peace-building forums in Nepal. She was a board member of Tewa, an NGO working with women. She has contributed to SAGUN (Search for Harmony), an NGO working for community empowerment. And, finally she is a founder-member of the Nepal Participatory Action Network, and has served on its board.

11-Dec-2005
More by :  Subhash Arora
 
Views: 1236
 
Top | Society







A Bystander's Diary Analysis Architecture Astrology Ayurveda Book Reviews
Buddhism Business Cartoons CC++ Cinema Computing Articles
Culture Dances Education Environment Family Matters Festivals
Flash Ghalib's Corner Going Inner Health Hinduism History
Humor Individuality Internet Security Java Linux Literary Shelf
Love Letters Memoirs Musings My Word Networking Opinion
Parenting People Perspective Photo Essays Places PlainSpeak
Quotes Ramblings Random Thoughts Recipes Sikhism Society
Spirituality Stories Teens Travelogues Vastu Vithika
Women Workshop
RSS Feed RSS Feed Home | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer | Site Map
No part of this Internet site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
Developed and Programmed by ekant solutions