Raking Up Old Wounds... by Ananya S Guha SignUp
Boloji.com

Channels

In Focus

 
Analysis
Cartoons
Education
Environment
Opinion
Photo Essays
 
 

Columns

 
Business
Random Thoughts
 
 

Our Heritage

 
Architecture
Astrology
Ayurveda
Buddhism
Cinema
Culture
Festivals
Hinduism
History
People
Places
Sikhism
Spirituality
 
 

Society & Lifestyle

 
Health
Parenting
Perspective
Recipes
Society
Teens
Women
 
 

Creative Writings

 
Book Reviews
Computing
Humor
Individuality
Literary Shelf
Memoirs
Quotes
Stories
Travelogues
Workshop
 
 
Analysis Share This Page
Raking Up Old Wounds...
by Ananya S Guha Bookmark and Share
The British Prime Minister David Cameron has apologized indirectly about the Jallianwala Bagh episode in 1919. Were we waiting for it, as one of the newspapers gleefully reported Mr Cameron's expiation? Is this a very newsworthy thing to report or are we still shackled by colonialist stance, or is our response a post modern, read post colonial triumph?

The tragedy took place almost a century back. To talk about it now is not to heal wounds, but rake them. Do we need apologies now? Do we need consolation now? On the one hand it is an ostensible gentlemany gesture, on the other it is not necessary and needless. And one of the leading newspapers reporting it as a headline is humbug. This is as if that amends have been  made, the wrong has been corrected. Historical wrongs can be treated at best as aberrations, but they cannot be corrected. If this was a wrong, then the entire colonial phase was also wrong.

If this episode has been selectively mentioned as something that was overtly wrong, then the British imperialism is justified, that is to say: our rule was alright, but this was a blemish in our history of colonial rule in India. Post modernists who glibly use this expression, like post colonialism could do some research on this extravaganza, and find out what exactly the British Prime Minister was seeking to do! If he had apologized for the imperialistic take off and take over in India, then it might have made a little more sense. But to isolate it  and single out the Jallianwala Bagh tragedy is to add salt to the wounds, in my percetion of things.

History may or may not be repeated. But sordid histories need not be recollected, especially if a dignitary is making a courtesy visit. Telling journalists, that this was a shameful act is truism. We all know it, and how the massacre took place. If at all an apology had to come, it should have come then, but at that time British imperialism was besotted with power.

And, again our newspapers seem to be so happy at these remarks. We don't want apologies, we wanted condemnation, but did not get it at the correct juncture. The event has now passed into the annals of history, and the wrongs done there cannot be righted, so let's not make effete attempts at self discovery.

Let us look at the present and bilateral relationships between the two countries. Raking up the Bagh incident is like excavating old wounds. We want to forget them. Why remind us?

British Prime Minister Sir, I think you were a wee bit impolitic!
 
Share This:
21-Feb-2013
More by :  Ananya S Guha
 
Views: 1035      Comments: 0




Name *
Email ID
 (will not be published)
Comment *
Characters
Verification Code*
Can't read? Reload
Please fill the above code for verification.
 
Top | Analysis



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1999-2019 All Rights Reserved
 
No part of this Internet site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright holder
.