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Book Reviews Share This Page
Glittering Love
by Dr.Vijay Kumar Roy Bookmark and Share

Peeran, S. L. Glittering Love. Bangalore: Bizz Buzz, 2009.
ISBN: 978-81-88699-15-5. pp. xxxiii + 67. Price Rs. 100.

Glittering Love is Peeran’s eleventh collection of poems. It has varied elements of human values. In this collection also the poet does not rest on any one religion. He treats all religions alike. He is delighted in presenting the preachings of the religious stalwarts and using the names of Rama, Sita, Krishna, Buddha, Mahavira, Christ, Mohammad, Sai Baba and so on. He is aware of social injustice and like PB Shelley he sees tyranny spread in society. He writes that for this our ancestors are not responsible. We have created hell instead of heaven. He advises the modern man that:

Tyranny and man- made barriers
Were to be dislodged.
Equality and justice required,
To be imbibed, practiced.

Love and affection to be instilled
Hearts with music and song to be filled.
(9-14 ‘Music of Life’)

India is known for hospitality. The maxim ‘atithi devo bhava’ in Sanskrit is well known to all Indians. But the poet reveals that because of our hospitality and simplicity foreign invasions took place in India. He writes that we are:

…. too courteous, mild,
Well mannered, hospitable, kind,
Welcoming and gracious; …
(5-7, ‘Bullied’)

He further adds that our ‘arms and doors’ are open for all. We share our ‘culture, goodness’ and everything we possess with aliens and remain ‘oblivious to their evil intentions’. They took our cordialities as weakness and used ‘to captivate’, ‘Enslave’, and ‘overrule’ us for centuries. His poetry has examples of the effects of war and the birth of new nation causing economic crisis and numerous deaths. (‘Booming Economy’) Such national consciousness we don’t find elsewhere.
 
The poet is aware of the impact of Western culture on Indians (in ‘Cultural Change’) and advises the readers to ‘Follow Christ in letter and spirit’ and ‘Give up drinking wine, alcohol’. (‘Whither Modern Man?’) Subsequently, he dislikes the immorality spreading in Indian society:

Unwedded mothers, single mothers
Broken homes, juvenile delinquents
Destitution, prostitution, humiliation.
(14-16, ‘Whither Modern Man?’)

He believes in love and thinks that it is only love, through which peace and harmony can be established, but:

Love needs sacrifice and patience,
To create lovely garden of bliss.
(13-14, ‘Garden of Bliss’) 

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28-Nov-2014
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