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The Dark Colored Conqueror
by G Swaminathan Bookmark and Share

I have not yet come across a colorful God as Krishna in any literature.

He veers from the regular God and Hero in many ways; he is a character of a myriad shades. First of all, he is supposed to be dark yet seductive; call it blue or black. He is not a fair complexioned conventional handsome hero; yet he was able to be the cynosure of the eye of the entire pantheon of Hindu mythology, literature and even folklore. He had never donned the role of a male protagonist in any of the popular mythological works, yet played a significant one.

His birth itself is a complicated affair; born in prison and stealthily transported to Aayarbadi. He is not a docile or sober kid but a highly mischievous brat. Krishna is not just a thief of butter but also the darling of the women in Gokulam as a kid as well as a youth. His favorite companion Radha is much elder to him. Isn’t it improper? Nevertheless, he is the hero and inspiration to many poets, devotees, artists and always a part of music and dance. Because he enchanted his clan with his melodic music through flute and danced with the women in gay abandon. Even many male bakthas considered them as his female consorts and have composed poetry with shades of eroticism. He is a playboy as well as a philosopher.

Krishna is depicted as an expert politician in the Mahabharata. He allowed all the atrocities to happen only to be a witness. In the end only he takes sides. Even in the Kurkshetra Battle, he doesn’t touch any weapon but all the tricks he played to defeat Kauravas are not justifiable. He himself accepts it and even when he was admonished and cursed by Gandhari, he silently concedes.

Even if one reads the Bhagavatam one can find out his pranks and acts invariably bordering or absolutely deceitful. One is his marriage with Rukmini and his war with Jarasanda. By and large, he exhibits all the human traits of pranks, love, affection, care, hatred, tricks, and also altruism.

Probably, that must be the reason for everyone to like, love, write, sing, dance and remember Krishna fondly; a character with all the foibles yet lovable. He was a man without any mission but invariably part of any major mission.

I don’t know whom I should submit my appreciation; to the mythologists who created Krishna or those who have developed him effectively with many a shades through their fertile imagination.

Happy Krishna Jayanthi for the lover’s of the Dark Colored yet Handsome Playful Hero!

Post Scripts:

1. Those who want to read and enjoy about Krishna in the contemporary milieu, please buy and read the Tamil version (it is in English too) the book ‘Krishna Krishna’ by celebrated writer Indira Parthasarathy. (Kizhakku Pathippagam)

2. Interested to see the great colorful illustrations and portraits of Krishna with brief anecdotes? Buy and read the book ‘Krishna, Everyone’s God’ (Tatvaloka)

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01-Sep-2018
More by :  G Swaminathan
 
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