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Cinema Share This Page
Futuristic Cinema
by Seshu Chamarty Bookmark and Share
 
It must be my grandson who is watching a movie at the futuristic cinemas in 2033. The credits showed an array of overwhelming unisex robots and cartoons. Robots are the villains and the cartoon caricatures the protagonists interchangeably. The locations are utopian in nature. So it is difficult to associate a particular geography pictured in the movie. It can be Mars or any other planet left to the guess.

Cinema has since evolved, or transformed, into a new phenomenon which has come of age. The new generation producers are not inclined to take undue risks which were taken by their predecessors. In the olden days, the producers were bogged down by a plethora of writs and complaints filed on account of slurs which were presumed, be they political or real, as gathered from the scenes or sound bites. The slurs used to be based on religion, caste, region, gender, et al.  

Now, even the titles to the movies are some neutral numbers. Earlier, the names of films with some meanings suggested something that was politically incorrect. Now the storyline is very silly of course, compared to the older movies. Yet the themes are very novel. The plot is nowhere related to the goings-on in any corner of the real world.
 
Emotions have little room in the interplay of the characters of the new cinema. A handshake is a mere raising of flag or some other object in any of the scenes. If it is waved, then it amounts to kissing. If the flag is placed on a firm ground, be it a glass placed on the bar in a hotel, that means there is scope for certain deeper relation amounting to consummation. It is for the conjecture to be felt by the audiences relating to one's own feelings. The director of the movie has nothing to do with it and swears so, as not intended in the certificate screened at the beginning of the movie.
 
Comedy in the film is materially or markedly absent. If the audience wants comedy, all they can do is take a bottle attached to the seat and lift the same carefully. They have to direct pointedly the nozzle into one’s own face and press the button. It releases the laughing gas. The viewer then should attach a mask and laugh his or her heart out silently, lest the neighbor is affected and took offence.

The tragic side of emotions is released by yet another bottle on the left side of the seat. It contains good old glycerin which has to be dropped into one’s eyes to produce tears.  Soon after, the viewer has to put on a helmet with a black visor, such that others in the rows around did not watch him/her crying. (Be it the spouse in the adjacent seat.)
 
Usually reviews are not published either on the net or in print. Censor boards give no rating as such for the movie viewership and all films are universal by default.  One or two films are mandatorily produced for Parental Guidance just to guide youngsters to learn as how to use the right bottle for right effect of emotion.

Trophies shaped in triangle and awards which do not relate to any particular department are given on the basis of viewers rating. The viewers are mandated to rate the film after the show at the exit of theatres. Statistics are consolidated nationwide/ worldwide to decide on the best movie, best lead robots, best lead cartoons, (always in multiple numbers) best sound bite, etc. No producer is worried about these awards since getting them is like winning a lottery ticket.

After watching the movie, my grandson records his impressions on a console at the exit of the theatre. Next, he drives home and do not tell the story to his wife, since it is confidential. In fact he takes an oath at the box office or on the booking portal. His wife senses her husband has just returned from a cinema after looking at his damp shirt and his funny smelling face.
 
She goes to the show the next day to check her own comprehension of the movie vis-à-vis her husband’s, i.e. with the help of the wet or funny quotient left on the clothes. It is also to check her IQ levels.
 
Impression: Pity, cinema evolved into a historic puppet show thanks to the controversies generated in the beginning of 21 century.
 
2-Feb-2013
More by :  Seshu Chamarty
 
Views: 465
 
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